This is a transcript of SYS 503 – Film Festival Success With Writer/Director Julia Bergeron .


Welcome to Episode 503 of the Selling Your Screenplay Podcast. I’m Ashley Scott Meyers, screenwriter and blogger with www.sellingyourscreenplay.com. Today I am interviewing filmmaker Julia Bergeron, who did a short film called That Last Girl. A couple of weeks ago I had on Brian McQuery, whose film Plea is the opening night feature film. And then That Last Girl will be our opening night short film, which will show right before Plea. That’s going to take place here on Los Angeles October 6th at 6pm. Check out our website for more details. www.sixfigurefilmfestival.com. Anyway, stay tuned for that interview.

If you find this episode valuable, please help me out by giving me a review in iTunes or leaving a comment on YouTube or retweeting the podcast on Twitter or liking or sharing it on Facebook. These social media shares really do help spread word about the podcasts and they’re very much appreciated. Any websites or links that I mentioned the podcast can be found on my blog in the show notes. I also publish a transcript with every episode in case you’d rather read the show or look at something later on. You can find all the podcast show notes at www.sellingyourscreenplay.com/podcast and then just look for episode number 503. If you want my free guide How to Sell Screenplay in five weeks, you can pick that up by going to www.sellingyourscreenplay.com/guide. It’s completely free. You just put in your email address and I’ll send you a new lesson once per week for five weeks, along with a bunch of bonus lessons. I teach the whole process of how to sell your screenplay in that guide. I’ll teach you how to write a professional logline and query letter and how to find agents managers and producers who are looking for material. Really is everything you need to know to sell your screenplay just go to www.sellingyourscreenplay.com/guide.

So, a quick few words about what I’m working on. Obviously, the screenplay contest and the film festival have been keeping me very busy the last few weeks. Keep an eye out for our final contest announcement October 17th, when we will be announcing this year’s winner. That’s definitely been keeping me busy reading lots of scripts and getting them sent out to all of the industry judges. I’ve got everything lined up for the film festival pretty much. If you’re in the LA area the weekend of October 7th, please do consider stopping by be great to see some of the listeners of the selling your screenplay podcast. We’ve got a great slate of cool indie films this year. So, check out our website and see if there might be some films that you would like to come out and see. There will be lots of indie filmmakers around this weekend, it’s going to be a great opportunity to potentially meet some of these indie filmmakers. I mean, one of the things I come on often talk about on this podcast is just getting out there and doing some networking. And I sort of hope that I’m creating that environment, I’m creating a nice easy way for people to come out and just meet some of the other indie producers. If you’re a writer, also consider maybe shooting something this next year, shoot a short on your phone. And maybe we can screen that at next year’s festival. So you can not just be someone there networking, you can be an actual filmmaker at the festival. I don’t think we’ve ever turned down a single film that came from an SYS listener. So really listen to what I’m saying, if you listen to this podcast, you make a short film, just email me [email protected]. Tell me you listen to this podcast, tell me enter the film festival. And you will get a very, very generous look at your film. As I said, I don’t think we’ve ever turned anybody down. And certainly not a short film from an SYS listener, really trying to create a great opportunity just to get writers out there to meet directors, to meet producers, to meet actors just to meet people. And again, it’s just another great opportunity to potentially have your short film screened in a actual movie theater. Anyways, without further ado, here is Julia Bergeron to talk about her short film, That Last Girl which again will be our opening night short film.

Ashley 

Welcome Julia to the Selling Your Screenplay Podcast. I really appreciate you coming on the show with me today.

Julia Bergeron 

It’s nice to be here, Ashley.

Ashley 

So, to start out, maybe you can tell us a little bit about your background. Where did you grow up? And how did you get interested in the entertainment business?

Julia Bergeron 

So, I grew up in Santa Monica. And my dad was a director of photography. And so, I’ve been around the entertainment business all my life, I used to do acting, improv, particularly. So, at the Groundlings, you end up writing a lot of sketches. And I really found that I love writing and I had more success as writer than as an actor. And then once I had my kids, I was like, I didn’t really want to be going to the theater four nights a week and going to rehearsal and all of that and writing I felt was, I was better at it. I liked it and it kind of fit my lifestyle more.

Ashley 

So, then let’s talk about some of those first steps because I think your story is probably like a lot of people listening to this. You’ve had some children, you’re sort of starting a more traditional life with your husband and raising these kids. How do you fit in writing? And what were some of those steps to actually turn this into a career?

Julia Bergeron 

One thing I’m very lucky about is that my husband is an actor. And so, we had that in common. And we both understood about juggling schedules and things like that. So, I had that kind of support, which was great. I’ve always though, had to have like a paying job. And we started our own business, which is projection mapping. So that kind of takes care of the bills. So, between the job and the kids, writing for a while, took a backseat. And what I had to say there was a point in time where I was kind of discouraged about my writing career, and I wasn’t writing at all, and I was overwhelmed with work and kids and all of that. And then at some point, I decided that writing was super important to me. And one of the reasons why I was feeling discouraged was because I wasn’t writing, and whether or not like, I needed to be the determining factor of whether or not I was successful, not outside forces. And so not writing to me became not being successful. And then writing itself, just doing it starting and completing projects, made me feel like that was success. And I think coming from that place, sort of also made me a better writer.

Ashley 

So, then what were some of the steps… you and I, we probably met 10 years ago now at deadline junkies, a writer’s group here in LA. So, how did that sort of play in you have in the kids, you’re getting back into writing? What were some of the steps, was deadline junkies joined this writing group? Was that one of those steps back into the writing sphere?

Julia Bergeron 

Yeah, that was a huge step for me. I think joining a writing group is probably one of the most important things that you can do as a writer, because you need that feedback. And you really need to hear how things play, you need to understand what you’re communicating what people are missing, even though you thought it was on the page. And sometimes you’re like, oh, yeah, that really hit. And sometimes you’re like, how did you not understand that? But ultimately, right, your work has to speak for itself, because you’re not going to be there, you know, sitting next to the reader. So, your work has to stand on its own two feet, and getting feedback from a writer’s group, I think is the best way to improve quickly. And there’s a girl that I’m mentoring right now. And the first thing I asked her was, are you in a writer’s group? Because if you’re not in a writer’s group, how are you able to determine whether or not your work is landing how you expect, so that was a huge. I think entering contests helped, especially ones with feedback, because those are anonymous people who are just taking your work as it is, as it shows up in front of them. And they kind of don’t have a vested interest in anything else, but what’s there in front of them. And so getting feedback from those kinds of things has been helpful. And I’ve been a finalist and a lot of contests like screen craft, and Austin and a couple others. And so that’s a kind of encouragement, right? Where you go, oh, okay, I guess I’m on the right track. So that was a good step. I have a partner who we share work with. And we have kind of like, we don’t pull any punches. We were in a film festival one time where actually that last girl screen. And the woman next to us was saying, she got asked the question, well, how do you work with your partner? And she said, oh, we’re very careful about you know, making sure that we don’t step on each other’s toes. And me and my partner were like, Oh, we just say what were you thinking? Or whatever it is. So, I personally really like getting straightforward, honest feedback. You know, how else am I going to get better?

Ashley 

Yeah, yeah. And I was still we were still going to Deadline junkies at the same time when you first showed the script reports, right. I remember that coming through, which ended up being your first short film that you wrote and directed and produced. Maybe you can talk about that a little bit. Obviously, you had had your dad’s so you were was a cinematographer, so you’re probably on set. You had been around the business, but just how did you put this film together? Just as someone that didn’t have a background in production, how did you put it together? And how did you actually get this film produced?

Julia Bergeron 

So, with Porch Light, I wanted to shoot a short because I really wanted to learn as much as I could, because I think there’s difference between being on the set when you’re the kid of the DP, and being on the set when everything is on your shoulders. And you can learn a certain amount by watching but you learn so much more about everything, just by getting in there and doing it. So, I had a bunch of short scripts, and I just really liked Porch Light, but like, I thought it was funny. I thought it was something I could make. I didn’t have an unlimited budget, but I had an okay budget, it cost I think, like $6,500. And then that did not include the cost to put it in festivals. So, the basic way it came together was I worked with a friend and she had made a couple of shorts. She was an actress or writer producer. She was a friend of my husband’s and so she said that she would kind of like be my right hand. And so together, like you said I put the script a deadline junkies, I got feedback, I rewrote it. Then we cast it. I put a casting in LA casting, we had auditions. And one guy actually one of the lead guys was a friend of a friend. And I just saw his picture on Facebook and I went, oh, I think that’s my lead. So, I called him in and he was fantastic. And then we cast the rest of the people. I actually interviewed some DPs because I didn’t want, like my dad was not really able to do that at the time. And I really knew the look I wanted. So, I created a look-book, I interviewed a few the DPs and me and L&R just kind of hit it off, then I scouted locations because I had in mind what I wanted. So, I scouted locations all around Santa Clarita la everywhere, and I found this location which was it was available on the weekend for like less expensive, so we scouted it, then I scouted it with my DP. And so, then we go into shoot on the day. And this is a warning to everybody. Make sure you scout your location on the same day of the week that you plan to. Because we I scouted on a Tuesday and a Friday. And we shot on Saturday and Sunday. And it turns out that the airport changes the flight pattern on Saturday and Sunday. And so, we had so much interference from playing. It was just…

Ashley 

Yeah, that’s indie producing. Exactly. It was a great deal until you showed up. So, well a couple things on the development front. I’m curious. So, you brought this into deadline junkies, you got notes, you rewrote it? How do you know when a script is ready? Like how do you know when it’s ready to go from page to actually into pre-production and production?

Julia Bergeron 

That’s a great question. I kind of wonder if you ever know, like, even on set, we changed a few things. Not a lot. But I felt like the basic thing to me was I wasn’t getting character notes. I wasn’t getting structural loads. I wasn’t getting many notes. Like the notes were so minuscule that I was like, okay, this is done like I’m getting the laughs where I want to get the last people understood. So, I think that process of putting it out there and getting it back and putting it out there and getting it back and hearing from the actors and all of that. So, I think once you are kind of understanding that either you’re not getting many notes, or the notes that you’re getting would create a different movie, then I think you know, you’re done.

Ashley 

Gotcha. And let’s just you said you entered a bunch of film festivals with this. Maybe you can give us a couple of tips from someone who’s done the festival circuit with some shorts now. What do you look for when you’re going to submit to a festival? How do you maximize that money you’re spending on festivals? How do you get the most bang for the buck out of it?

Julia Bergeron 

So, for me, I got recommendations from some friends about festivals that they thought that my film would be a good fit For. So that was one thing, like I have friends that have done the festival circuit ahead of me. So, I got those kinds of tips. And then I also like read the reviews of the festivals on FilmFreeWay. I saw what people were saying what happened during the festival, after the festival. Someone had recommended to me Omaha Film Festival, and I was like, I would never have thought of that. And the reviews were great. And the people were so nice. And they talked about, you know, the screen and the quality of the screen. I met great filmmakers there, which I’m still in touch with. But that was a travel, I had to go there. And then in LA, there’s a few good festivals, dances with films is really good. And they have all of these festivals have specific criteria, like some of them want to be your world premiere. And if you’ve premiered somewhere else, they’re not going to take your film. Some of them want to be your West Coast Premiere or your la premiere. So, when you’re looking to submit, make sure that you’re understanding what the what the festivals rules are. So, you don’t want to have your premiere at a festival that is not really going to do anything for you. And then also eliminates the possibility from submitting to other festivals because you’ve already had your world premiere, something like that.

Ashley 

Yeah, for sure. Did you look at specific genres? That’s always a big thing. There’s a lot of genre festivals, you can sort on FilmFreeWay. But by that, did you find that to be helpful at all?

Julia Bergeron 

Not really. So, especially like, so ports, like, for example, is like a dark comedy Western. And they’re so what kind of festival? Is that going to fit in? Is it going to, you know, like, what is that one? It’s like heritage or something. So, it’s sort of Western II, but they don’t love dark comedies. So, I didn’t find that super helpful. I also think one thing that was really helpful for me, is making my film pretty short. Because if you’re going to go in with a 20-minute short, there’s less opportunity for your film to be screened, because they could fit two or maybe even three films. And at the same time, I mean, and also your budget is going to be a lot more.

Ashley 

Yeah. And as someone running a film festival, I can attest to that as well, I get these 30-minutes shorts, and they do they become almost like a feature there. You can’t really run a 30-minute short, in front of a 90-minute feature film, you can run a five-minutes shorter or 10-minutes short, but it gets a little it gets a little long. So, I definitely second that point. So, let’s dig into your most recent film, That Last Girl that film is going to be showing at the SYS film festival. I’ll just give a little plug there. It’s October 6th, 6PM in Glendale, California. And people can just check out the website www.sixfigurefilmfestival.com for ticket information. So, let’s dig into this film to start out, maybe give us a quick pitch or a logline, what is this, this new film all about?

Julia Bergeron 

So, I wanted to do like a dramatic thriller that was like limited location. And I wanted to learn a lot. And I had written this script like in phases, and it’s basically about a young woman who starting at a job. And you can tell something’s going on. And anyway, so, she discovers something that kind of turns the whole thing upside down.

Ashley 

Okay, where did this idea come from? What was sort of the genesis of this story?

Julia Bergeron 

So, a lot of times my ideas, they come in little pieces. And if for this one, the first piece actually was the feeling of what you would have, if you were that girl in that situation, like, and then from just that character feeling I built the story around it, like how do you get to that point? And which is kind of an I don’t know, that’s not how I always work. But a lot of times there’ll be a feeling or an idea or a moment that comes to me like it’s what I call a notion. And so, I had the notion of this girl in this moment in time. And then I kind of backtracked how she got there, and forward track what would happen after.

Ashley 

Gotcha, gotcha. And let’s talk a little bit about your writing process. And obviously, there’s a short so maybe it’s a little bit different. But I’d be curious to hear maybe you can kind of compare and contrast it to writing a feature. But what is your writing process look like? Where do you typically write Do you write in the morning do you write at Starbucks? Do you have a home office? Do you want ambient noise at the Starbucks just to sort of describe what your writing process looks like?

Julia Bergeron 

Because of the way my brain works. And the way my life is I don’t have a particular time that I write, I write, whenever I don’t write every day, some days I write all day, some days I write for an hour, it can be in the morning, it can be at night, it depends on what I have going on. And I write at home, I have a home office, and I closed the door, which is closed right now. Sometimes my dog is sitting with me, and being mobile buddy. And sometimes I’m by myself, I don’t listen to music, when I’m actually writing. I like to be quiet. But I find that music really helps me if I’m like, in the imagination, like idea phase. So, if I’m driving, like, I’m pretty, pretty busy person, and I tend to drive a lot, maybe not as much in the last few months, but driving and listening to music, I really find, you know, especially if I’m in traffic, like I will be able to like, solve seeing problems or come up with dialogue or ideas. So that’s really helpful for me. But on a daily basis, it’s all chaos.

Ashley 

Gotcha. Yeah. And that’s interesting. I’ve heard a variety of things. I personally like walk, I do walking and listen to music, and I get that same rhythm. And I feel like I do my best thinking, I’ve heard some people take a shower, and they do their best thing. So, everybody seems to have those things. I think it’s important that we find that for ourselves. So, let’s talk about just your outlining versus actually in Final Draft writing pages, how does your time sort of break out? How much time do you spend outlining, doing index cards versus how much time you’re actually in Final Draft cranking out script pages?

Julia Bergeron 

So, it depends on the project. I really find outlining difficult, I find it like balancing a checkbook, or working on taxes or something for me, it’s like so hard. And so I tend to just pick, like six or eight key moments. You know, I’ll have you know, the very beginning picture in my head, the very end, a few pieces in the middle. What’s the worst thing that happens? And then I I jump in, usually works for me. I just finished a script right now, that is completely out of my wheelhouse. And it’s a big mess. Because I didn’t outline. But I did discover, like, really interesting moments and twist that I don’t think I would have found had I detailed every scene. So, my process is pretty fluid.

Ashley 

Gotcha. What did you learn from writing this script? Are there any lessons that you can take away from That Last Girl?

Julia Bergeron 

Well, I don’t know if I’m going to have a great answer to that question. But I will tell you something that I took away from the shooting experience of it. And so, for this film, I’m fortunate I had a lot of help. I had a DP grip, I had a gaffer, I had an AD. And I had my friend who was assisting me I had pas one was my daughter, one was my daughter’s friend, but you know, I had them. And on That Last Girl, I had felt on porchlight that I didn’t learn as much as if I would have done more myself. So, I stole much on that last girl by myself. I wanted to see what I could accomplish with a really minimal budget, limited location, limited actors limited crew, just skeleton, right. And what I found was, first of all, there are some things that I’m really good at. And there’s some things that I’m not as good at. And I’ll give you an example. So, I am not a good script, scripty. Right.

Ashley 

Continuity, all that.

Julia Bergeron 

Not good at that. There’s a scene where the main lead guy is opening mail. So, he’s opening mail, we’re shooting he’s opening manual, and we’re shooting. And then I go to Edit, because I was the editor. And every piece of mail is different.

Ashley 

A different address or whatever.

Julia Bergeron 

It’s a different shape, color, size. And I’m like I lost so many takes because I had not been thinking about continuity. So, you can’t cut from the wire and he’s home Pulling up. So, yeah, I learned what I was, I’m actually a pretty good editor because I did make it work. But so that’s what I learned from that is that there’s things I’m good at, there’s things that I’m not as good at. And the one big lesson is, I think the most important thing out of that experience, and out of course, like I was learning that I really like working with actors, and seeing how they bring the characters and the words and everything that I’ve written, like to a whole new level, there’s so it’s so good, it’s so much fun. And I always wish I would have more time with them. But well, as you know, like when you’re directing and producing, you don’t always have especially on a lower budget, you don’t always have that time. And so, a little bit of rehearsal is great, but I always on both of those I wished I would have had a little more time.

Ashley 

Gotcha, gotcha. So, how do you approach screenplay structure on something like this? In deadline junkies, they were big fans of Blake Snyder. So, he has that sort of template that he lays out the Blake Snyder beat sheet. But how do you approach structure? And then how do you approach some of those lessons in terms of a short? What does the short structure look like? You still have that beginning middle end, you still have act breaks the midpoint? Maybe you can speak on that a little bit?

Julia Bergeron 

Sure. For me, I think the most important thing, and I watched a lot of shorts, right, because I went to a lot of film festivals, and then watch before and after. And I think the two really important things are, something has to keep happening, the stakes have to keep rising, rising, rising, and I think you need a really good twist. I’ve seen shorts that felt very flat, because there was no beginning middle end, there was no twist, it didn’t feel like the characters had a goal. And those things are just as important in short as they aren’t a feature, right, you have to keep that rising tension. There are two things that I use, a couple things that I use in outlining and shaping. One is, I can’t remember who did this. But it’s a four-beat thing. And it starts with orphan. Let me think it’s orphan, wanderer, warrior, martyr. And so, at the beginning, your character is an orphan, then they’re wandering around, then they’re a warrior. And in the end, they’re a martyr. And the martyr actually means that they give up something for something better. And I don’t always hit that moment, but I really love it when I do. Another thing that I use is, it’s another fork thing. I think it’s just basically my skeleton version of Blake Snyder, where I have like the setup, then I have fun and games, and bad guys close in, and then the climax. I can’t I don’t tend to really get into super detailed outlining and structure. I mean, maybe I’d be better off if I did, but I don’t it doesn’t work for me. So, I think having those big tentpole moments. And to me, also, really importantly, is your thematic question, I tend to always run on the same theme, which is what would you do for the people that you love? And if you look at That Last Girl, it’s definitely in there. If it’s even important, like, what would you do for the people that you love? And it’s in pretty much everything I write. The good thing about that is sometimes when I’m struggling or lost, I will go back to that theme and go, well, what are they going to do for the people that they love? And if it’s not always on the top of my mind, that’s fine. But it’s always in there somewhere, no matter, like I write in lots of different genres. I know some people don’t, but I do. And but that’s always in everything. So, if you can figure out that question that you like to wrestle with, now, I find it super helpful.

Ashley 

Yeah, yeah, I agree. So, you mentioned that you had written a bunch of shorts, and certainly after porch light, you probably had written a bunch more. Why did you choose That Last Girl? Was there something in it as opposed to some of these other shorts and I’m just trying to kind of understand your sort of your mindset of, you know, going into and actually producing one of the things why did you pick the last girl versus any of these any number of these other ones?

Julia Bergeron 

Well, there were a couple of reasons why I really liked the twist. I liked the emotional component of it, I wanted to try writing like our shooting a thriller drama type thing. And for this in particular, it’s 1.25 locations, it’s like one office and a shot in the kitchen. So, keeping that location, some of my shorts, like, a budget would probably be a feature. But at the time, when I’m writing it, I’m not thinking budgets, so much. So That Last Girl, I knew I could make it on a lower budget. And in Deadline Junkies, we have some fantastic actors, right. And when I was looking at it, I thought, oh, my goodness, Tyler would be so good in this part. And he is. And so, access to talent was, you know, somebody who could really play the part. And I don’t know that I thought it was just a cool, that those are kind of like all the practical considerations. And then like, the emotional consideration, is that I just loved the script. Like, I thought it would be a fun challenge.

Ashley 

And I think you’re hitting on something too, as we were talking about writers’ groups at the top of the interview, that’s another big advantage is you have access to these actors, you become really friends, and they become your associates and everything else, and they’re looking to, they’re there. They’re a Deadline Junkies, just, you know, trying to meet writers, just like we’re writers trying to meet actors. So, it’s another great, you know, lag of joining a writers group. So I just like to end these interviews by asking the guests if it’s anything you’ve seen recently that you think is really great. HBO, Hulu, Netflix, anything that’s out there playing now that you can recommend to our mostly screenwriting audience.

Julia Bergeron 

So, a few things I did on Bourbon Heimer in Montreal, and I thought those movies were fantastic, super different, but great. And for very different reasons. But like for series right now, I’m watching The Lincoln Lawyer. I think the performances in that are so good. Just really strong. And the look is kind of interesting. The lead actors super interesting. And the setting is out in LA. So, it’s kind of fun to go. Oh, I know where that is. I just think that’s a really great show.

Ashley 

Yeah, yeah. And where’s that playing? I have not seen that.

Julia Bergeron 

I think it’s Netflix.

Ashley 

Is it Netflix? Okay, perfect. Yeah, that’s a great recommendation. And I remember the it’s based on the movie or to spin off from the Matthew McConaughey movie. Sort of a sleeper movie of his it’s actually quite good. Of all the Matthew McConaughey movies out there. It’s actually a pretty good one.

Julia Bergeron 

It’s good. And it’s, you know, it’s like a serialize. He’s a lawyer, but it’s sort of detective eat. And it keeps you guessing.

Ashley 

Yeah. So well, how can people see The Last Girl, as I mentioned, is going to definitely show here at the SYS Film Festival. But how else can people potentially see it if they want to check it out?

Julia Bergeron 

Right now, it is only going to be showing at the festival. It’s on Vimeo. I don’t know if it’s access to the public yet. I could make it access to the public. And I’m planning on putting it on my website, which is JuliaBergeron.com. But I haven’t done it yet. I don’t know why not?

Ashley 

Well, perfect. Perfect, there you go. So, I’ll put a link to your website in the show notes. People can click over to that. And check it out. So, what’s the best way for people… Obviously your website, we’ll put that in the links, but what’s the best way for people to keep up with what you’re doing? I can publish your Twitter, you know, Facebook, Instagram, anything you’re comfortable sharing? I’ll put in the show notes.

Julia Bergeron 

Oh, yeah. Great. Okay, so I’m on Twitter and Facebook and Instagram. I don’t post all that much. But they can also go to my website and just see what I’ve been up to.

Ashley 

Is there one of the social media platforms you prefer? Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, and it’s not a loaded question. I don’t prefer any of them. So, there’s no harm.

Julia Bergeron 

Maybe, maybe Twitter, which I still go with or thank you very much. So yeah,

Ashley 

Yeah. So perfect. Perfect. Well, Julian, thanks for coming on and talking with me about this film. Good luck with this film. I look forward to screening it here at the SYS Film Festival and seeing you there as well.

Julia Bergeron 

Yeah, I look forward to being there. That’s going to be so much fun.

Ashley 

It is. Perfect. Well, we’ll see you then. Thank you much.

Julia Bergeron 

Thanks, Ashley.

I just want to talk quickly about SYS select. It’s a service for screenwriters to help them sell their screenplays and get writing assignments. The first part of the service is the SYS select screenplay database. Screenwriters upload their screenplays, along with a logline, synopsis and other pertinent information like budget and genre and then producers search for and hopefully find screenplays they want to produce. Dozens of producers are in the system looking for screenplays right now. There have been a number of success stories come out of the service. You can find out about all the SYS select successes by going to www.sellingyourscreenplay.com/success. Also, on SYS podcast episode 222, I talked with Steve Daring who was the first official success story to come out of the SYS select database. When you join SYS select you get access to the screenplay database, along with all the other services that we’re providing to SYS select members. These services include the newsletter, this monthly newsletter goes out to a list of over 400 producers who are actively seeking writers and screenplays. Each SYS select member can pitch one screenplay in this monthly newsletter. We also provide screenwriting leads, we have partnered with one of the premier paid screenwriting leads services, so I can syndicate their leads to SYS select members, there are lots of great paid leads coming in each week from our partner. Recently, we’ve been getting 5 to 10 high quality paid leads per week. These leads run the gamut. There are producers looking for a specific type of spec script to producers looking to hire a screenwriter to write up one of their ideas or properties. They’re looking for shorts, features, TV, and web series, pilots all types of projects. If you sign up for SYS select you’ll get these leads emailed directly to you several times per week. Also, you get access to the SYS select forum, where we will help you with your logline and query letter and answer any screenwriting related questions that you might have. We also have a number of screenwriting classes that are recorded and available in the SYS select forum. These are all the classes that I’ve done over the years, so you’ll have access to those whenever you want once you join. The classes cover every part of writing your screenplay, from concept to outlining, to the first act, second act, third act as well as other topics like writing short films, and pitching your projects in person.

Once again, if this sounds like something you’d like to learn more about, please go to www.sellingyourscreenplayselect.com. Again, that is sellingyourscreenplayselect.com. On the next episode of the podcast, I’m going to be interviewing indie filmmaker Jim Townes. Jim is a real indie filmmaker. He’s got dozens of credits as a writer, director and producer. Definitely have a look at his resume on IMDb before next week, if you care to check it out. He just did a film called End Times which is a post-apocalyptic love story. So, we’ll talk about his latest film as well as how he broke in and got some of his very first credits as a writer director. So, keep an eye out for that episode next week. That’s the show. Thank you for listening.